The mysteries of the Qur'an

In every sound of the Qur’an God is present, the Unknowable. The Qur’an is the occurrence that it wants to be: a revelation. That is why every enlightenment is transfiguration at the same time. To gain understanding we need humility but also closeness to ourselves. Only reading through the Qur’an will leave its message in the dark and it will be missed, if mere judgement is passed on the Qur’an. The first commandment of the Qur’an is, “Proclaim!” (or “Read!”) (96:1) Try to understand! Understand, what God wants to say, existence, nature, mankind and yourself. Understand, in order to always get your nourishment, your guidance, your life from it. 

When we say that the Qur’an is always valid beyond time and space, it is our task to delve into its message and to bring it to life in our lives. On these days we will try to open up to this holy book through explanations, and by delving into the individual verses and suras.

Like the world, the Qur’an is one and diverse at the same time. The world is a diversity that divides and splits, the Qur’an is a diversity that gathers and leads to oneness. The Qur’an shows us the paths of those who found the path to Allah and of those who lost the path. The Qur’an wants to bring together what was separated and to revive what was forgotten. 

When we look at the Qur’an, ambiguity can be seen as the encompassing principle and the Arab language is a master of ambiguity and variety. The Qur’an has stayed the same for more than 1,400 years and yet the same words have a different effect on us, according to our awareness. Clinging to words in the Qur’an does not bring understanding. Every introduction to the Qur’an rather reflects the awareness and point of view of the interpreter than the Qur’an itself.

In every sound of the Qur’an God is present, the Unknowable. The Qur’an is the occurrence that it wants to be: a revelation. That is why every enlightenment is transfiguration at the same time.  Allah says, “We have not sent down the Qur’an to you for your distress” (20:1), but as a guide and means to bliss.